Friday Five: Building Community Through Morning Meeting

Kids standing together to build community in morning meeting

Morning Meeting- Building Community One Morning At a Time

One

Good Morning, Sunshine!

Morning meeting begins with a greeting. The greeting helps build community because it allows students to say hello to each other and to settle into the learning space for the day. We, as teachers at meetings, also like to have time to say hello to each other before we begin the work we have at meetings. Kids want the same opportunity, and it isn’t tough to facilitate it.  

Greetings can be opportunities to get silly with your class. Just a few weeks ago, we did a greeting in different silly voices, and some kids laughed so hard they cried. The greeting can also be a time to reaffirm one another through compliments or to catch up on our weekends. Coming together as a group is a great way to begin the day. 

On the first day of each new week, our class shares one smile and one frown from the weekend. These smiles and frowns help kids make connections with one another. Oh, you fell when you were skiing this weekend and hurt your arm? Once that happened to me. I went to a birthday party too! Did you eat cake? Through smiles and frowns, we build connections as a class. We also work to develop empathy as we hear about different events in each other’s lives. Now, not everyone is forced to share a smile and a frown because that would take away the safety of the space created through morning meetings. Kids may also share two smiles if they don’t have a frown. The rules are flexible.

Two

Routines Are Life

Kids thrive in routines. Kids knowing exactly what is going to happen first thing in the morning creates a calm start to the day. Usually, around October, kids in my class start to go through the motions of morning meeting all on their own. When I taught first grade a few years ago, a parent needed to speak with me at the start of the day. As I was in the hall, the bell to start the day rang. When I stepped back into my classroom a few moments later, the kids were just finishing up the greeting. Routines are life!

Three

Conflict Resolution

Morning meetings can solve so many of those little issues in the classroom. We frequently have community problem-solving time at the end of the morning meeting. Sometimes kids make small announcements like, I had to pick up ten pencils yesterday that kids just left on the floor. Can you please remember to put your pencils back? Other times I’ll use the activity time of morning meeting to build each other up when we’re having a tough time getting along. Doing a quick compliment chain can change up your classroom environment. Creating a strong community makes a world of difference in the classroom, and conflict resolutions is a large part of that.

FOur

Build Conversation Skills

During morning meetings, we don’t do hand raising (*usually*). We learn how to have conversations together. We’re learning life skills like two people cannot talk at the same time because neither one is heard. We learn how to add on to someone’s ideas. We learn what to happen when two people begin talking at the same time. Knowing basic conversation skills is essential, and morning meeting is the perfect time to practice them and work through the tricky parts.

Five

Do What Works For You

I know the morning meeting format is greeting, share, activity, and morning message. I don’t follow that format exactly. When I taught first grade, we did the greeting, School Tools TV, schedule, and Daily Dendrite Challenge. We also had a feeling word each week that we discussed in depth. Now that I am teaching third, we do it a little bit differently. We typically do a greeting, School Tools TV, and then an activity. On Tuesdays, we always have some sort of quick check-in or lesson on the Zones of Regulation. 

Don’t be afraid to customize morning meeting to fit your style. At the end of the day, our goal is to connect as a community and create a strong bond together. There are many different paths to the same outcome. Do what works for you! 

Do you use morning meetings in your classroom? What benefits do you see? Do you stick to the Responsive Classroom structure or make it your own? I’d love to hear more in the comments below! 

Friday Five: Back to School After Winter Break

Friday Five: Back to School After Winter Break

Going back to school after winter break can be ROUGH! We’ve all been there. Transitioning back into the new year can be tricky. The kids are still in vacation mode, and you might be too. Here are five tips to help reign it in and get back to business after a long break.

Getting Back to School After winter Break

One

Catch Up With Each Other

You just had a break! Take a minute to catch up and share all about your holidays. As an international teacher, students often travel to different countries and places over breaks. We usually get out the map and look where everyone went on holiday. This is a lot of fun. Kids also share what I call smiles and frowns. Smiles are those significant parts of vacation and frowns the not so great part. 


After a break ease back in and take a moment to check in as a community. Maybe that doesn’t look like getting down the map. Maybe it looks like enjoying a cup of hot chocolate or tea and talking about the best parts of our break. Maybe it means taking a moment to write a story about the break. Any way you do it is great. Isn’t the best part of coming back to school after a break catching up with your teacher friends? Let your kids enjoy that too.

Two

Get Back Into Routines

Routines are like the glue that holds all the learning together. I like to remind students of expectations and keep them to it after a break. We usually spend the first weeks back after break reviewing our routines and practicing them. Don’t wait too long to get back into them, or it might feel like you never will. Remember that time spent reviewing routines now will save you time later. Make sure you’ve all got your routines back down before diving too far into learning.

Three

Have some Fun

Joy and laughter are so important in the classroom. Don’t forget while reviewing those routines and diving back into content to take some time for fun. Fun can be anything! Maybe it’s a fun hidden picture, and perhaps it’s an extra Go Noodle video, maybe it’s playing four corners. Just make sure that there’s some fun and laughter in your classroom during your first days back as a teacher.

FOur

Take Time For Yourself

Don’t burn yourself out! Hopefully, you took the vacay to live your non-teacher life. So now, don’t spend the first weeks back living at school. Utilize those prep times and try not to stay too late. Take time to invest in your life outside of school as well. The more you invest in yourself as a person, the better you are as a teacher. Trust me.

Five

Give Yourself Grace

Wouldn’t it be nice if everything worked out perfectly after a holiday? Yeah, I can dream about that world, but realistically it doesn’t. Give yourself grace. Take that time away from yourself. Look into using Calm or another meditation app for those moments when things are too much. I can’t tell you how many times I’ve done a quick emergency calm session when the kids went to specials. Remember, you’ll get there. You will get back into learning and all of the routines that make your classroom a beautiful place. Rome wasn’t built in a day. 

How do you like to set your self up for success after a break? 

Weekly Wisdom

The objective of education is not to fill a man's mind with facts; it is to teach him how to use his mind in thinking. Henry Ford

Why Classroom Management Falls Apart

Why Classroom Management Falls Apart

Middle School Choir

Recently I was sitting in my classroom and thought of sixth-grade choir. I don’t know why I randomly thought of it- but I did. In my middle school, everyone had to take a music class but you elected which one you took. There was band, choir, and music appreciation. My parents said no to band because I quit the piano in fifth grade. Music appreciation was a lot of work with tests and quizzes and presentations. No thank you! In choir, you had to sing and perform one song (as a group) during the band concert. That seemed manageable to me. Middle School Natasha was all about doing the least amount of work as possible. So were many other students in my grade.

It was so obvious that choir was the easiest of the three choices. Our class was packed full of trouble makers looking for an easy out to music class. Since choir was the most popular option there were the most students in that class. I would say there were about 35 but I could be very off.

I don’t remember the name of the music teacher. She was quite small and even while standing could barely see over the top of the piano. She had a great voice and was a great singer but could not handle our class. I haven’t taught middle school in years (if student teaching a semester of middle school even counts) but I do know that if you give them an inch they take a mile. Let’s talk about why her classroom management fell apart. 

A note on the term "Classroom Management"

I really don’t like it. I much prefer to think of my classroom as a community. A community where everyone is welcome and has a seat at the table. I don’t manage my students. Just today I was scolded by a student because I interrupted another student during a class conversation. It was true. I had gotten used to interrupting as a teacher and it was a bad habit I needed to break. She reminded me that it isn’t respectful to not let someone finish their idea. I apologized and worked on this as my goal for the rest of the day.

The term management makes it seem as though the teacher is working to control the students. As a teacher, I don’t have control of my students. Gasp! I explain to my students that they can only control themselves. They are just as important to our classroom community as I am. I follow a lot of Responsive Classroom’s practices and building a community of learners is one of them. I wouldn’t say I really have classroom management strategies I have relationship building strategies. 

A 45 Minute Period

Let me just paint a picture of a 45-minute choir class just so you know what we’re working with. It was the last period of the day and kids arrived to class around 5-7 minutes late no matter what. To be honest, I even arrived to class late because it didn’t really matter if I showed up on time or not. It’s true! 

After we all arrived our teacher would take attendance. This was a long process where she was trying to learn all of our names. I would say the first 15 minutes were settling in and taking attendance. That’s one third of our class time.

Once attendance finished we would warm up. She attempted to lead us through a vocal warm-up and some sassy kids would change the warm-up. They made everyone laugh and then we would all be in a bit of trouble. 

During warm-ups, someone would ask to go to the bathroom. I will say that during middle school we had a very strict no bathroom during class time policy. Let’s talk about that one day because it is absurd! So we weren’t allowed to use the bathroom in class… yeah. Once one kid asked kids cycled in and out of class in groups of 2 or 3 for the duration of the class period. 

After warm-ups, we would begin to sing. The songs we were singing weren’t particularly interesting to us middle schoolers. So we would change the words and sing silly nonsensical things. We would goof around and laugh and start talking with one another. Then came the yelling. Our teacher would start screaming at us and then we would straighten out for a few minutes only to start the chit-chat up again a little while later. 

We might sing a few songs and then it was 5 minutes before the bell was to ring and we would pack up and wait at the door. Our teacher always yelled at us and we always pushed closer and closer to the door. The bell would ring and class would end. We ran out of the room talking very loudly.

Now, maybe your classes aren’t as catastrophic as this one was but let’s analyze where classroom management falls off the tracks

The Break Down

There was no teacher student relationship

Relationships are everything. I like to follow a Responsive Classroom approach to management. I have no idea what my choir teacher’s name was. I didn’t know anything about her. She knew absolutely nothing about me. I showed up to choir, she took attendance and then stood behind the piano and attempted to teach. There were no relationships. Kids who might be considered class clowns tried to form a relationship with her- not in the best of ways. Any questions about her life or who she was were not answered and were ignored. Kids don’t need to know everything about their teacher but they do need some sort of connection.

Figure out what you’re willing to share. So you don’t want to divulge your whole life story, that’s ok. My kids know very crafted bits about my life. They know about my sister and my love for Target. They know about my naughty dog in the US. They know the names of my childhood friends. I know things about them. I know who likes unicorns and who prefers Messi to Ronaldo, I know who likes to read fiction and who likes to read nonfiction. There has to be some sort of teacher/student relationship. Learning is built on relationships. The stronger the relationship between the students and the teacher the better. Teachers- you have to think that each child in your class can accomplish the impossible. They have to know that you care for them and respect them. 

Rules were stated but never enforced

We knew the rules. Arrive on time. Listen while the teacher is talking. Sing the correct lyrics to the songs. Rules were stated but there was no enforcement of rules. I notice this a lot when I’m struggling with classroom community and when others are. If there are never redirections or logical consequences for breaking the rules the limits begin to be tested. If I sing the wrong word one time and nothing happens, I’ll do it again and again. If I mock the directions you’re giving and you don’t tell me to stop I will keep going. Kids are always looking for boundaries and when they can’t find them they continue to push the limits.

Instead of rules try building expectations together as a class. We do this in my first-grade classroom. We have three main rules that tie in with our school’s guiding statements be respectful, be responsible, strive for excellence. We also have other expectations. We set up expectations for the carpet, for the bathroom, for getting a drink. There are expectations and there are procedures. Just recently kids noticed that kids were throwing their paper towels on the ground instead of making sure they made it into the garbage can. They asked to hold a class meeting to talk about it. We did and it hasn’t been a problem since. Kids need ownership over their classroom and creating expectations (that are upheld all the time, not sometimes) together is a great way to start. 

Behaviors were never dealt with until they were too extreme 

15 kids all asking to go to the bathroom one right after the other wasn’t a problem until literally every kid in the class went to the bathroom and we just cycled in and out. True story- we had very strict bathroom rules in middle school. (I once peed my pants in 7th grade because of this policy and was denied going to the bathroom several times. This has stuck with me and I never ask kids to hold it. This is a story for another day. And, I wasn’t the only one that happened to. It was frequent in our middle school. Once the bathrooms were even locked… ok, saving it for later) Singing the wrong lyrics didn’t really matter until suddenly we were being yelled at. Small behavior problems were never stopped because they were small. Does it matter if one kid sings the wrong lyrics? Yes, it actually does. 

Try dealing with little problems on a daily basis. Deal with problems right when they occur no matter how small. Dealing with problems when they are small and manageable is much preferred to waiting until they get out of control. Once behaviors are extreme they’re harder to rein in. Even though a student talking at the same time as the teacher seems like a small problem, if it isn’t dealt with right away, it is going to turn into a big problem. Set boundaries and stick to them. Enforce expectations consistently. 

Students Talked At the Same Time As the Teacher

When students are talking at the same time as anyone no one’s really being heard. Teachers talk to share important information so if a student is talking at the same time they are missing something and so are other students. What may start as whispers will surely grow if it isn’t stopped. Students will then become frustrated with each other and could start suggesting classroom management strategies to deal with other students. No good will come from this. 

Teach that only one person can speak at a time. Students need to listen to you but they also need to listen to each other. Deal with these small behaviors right when they happen. Don’t wait until it is too late to course correct. Sometimes simple redirection is needed. Sometimes I have class conversations around listening. We need to teach listening skills and expectations in the classroom. If it isn’t going well then teach it again.  

Yelling was the Only Strategy For Anything

Yelling. Not the greatest tool to use. After some reflection on my own teaching, I realized that I yell when I am tired, when I am cranky, when I am unprepared, or when I need to take a break. Yelling doesn’t work. Maybe at the moment the first time you yell it works but not really. Did you notice that the situations when I yell were all because something was wrong with me not the students? We got screamed at for getting out of our seats.

Actually… I just remembered Freshman Year Chemistry. Our teacher was a chemist turned teacher with no teacher training. He yelled so much that we just tuned it out. Mr. C then resorted to bringing pots to throw at the ground to make a large bang to get our attention. It only worked for a little bit of time. Yelling and extreme actions only work for a short amount of time. They don’t fix the deeper issues. 

Take a deep breath. Do a little reflecting and notice the times when you yell. I know I can get short with students when I am stressed or when I am not as prepared as I should be. In college, I realized not getting enough sleep made me a cranky teacher. Once you know what triggers you to yell do your best to avoid those things. I now go to sleep at a respectable hour. I plan my lessons in advance and when things go wrong I learn for next time. I step away from my classroom if needed when I am stressed. Take care of yourself. Whatever you need to take care of yourself and remind yourself yelling just creates more chaos it doesn’t create solutions. 

Nothing Was Consistent

Sometimes rules were enforced. Sometimes we had to sing the songs. Sometimes you could do whatever you want. Somedays we followed a structure to class and sometimes we didn’t. Inconsistency is a huge problem. My first year teaching I wasn’t consistent at all. I didn’t always follow the schedule, I sometimes laughed at bad behavior when I should not have, and sometimes I didn’t enforce expectations. Listen we’re all a little inconsistent from time to time but that creates unpredictability in students. If one day you’re using compliments to encourage students and the next day they’re earning tickets and then they’re earning points- the classroom management isn’t consistent. Kids can’t follow along to inconsistent strategies. 

Create structure and stay consistent. Show your students that you are someone who is reliable. Someone who enforces every transgression in the same manner. If any kid shoves another kid the same thing happens. If any kids shout out in the middle of a lesson the same thing happens. Keep consistent and follow a structure. Providing your students with predictability is always a good thing. It allows them to focus on the task at hand and it helps them set boundaries to understand the class expectations. 

No Follow Through

There has to be follow through. Seriously, if I say that we will have a quick chat after I give directions then we are going to have a quick chat. If I say we are writing an email to mom and dad then we are writing the email to mom and dad. If I say you have to spit out your gum then you have to spit out your gum. Follow through is essential. I know that if I don’t follow through I lose credibility and if I lose that then I have nothing left. 

Make guarantees, not empty threats. In college, once I heard a campus safety officer explain to a woman that he doesn’t make empty promises, he makes guarantees. This needs to be the same motto for classroom management. Don’t tell a student something is going to happen and then not follow through. That creates inconsistencies. Follow through all the time, in similar ways, with every student. Don’t worry about being well liked. I’ve noticed that students like teachers who are reliable and fair. Be reliable and fair. 

Whole class punished for some

As one of the “good kids” most of my life when the whole group is punished because of one or a few students it is the absolute worst. The bathroom policy I mentioned before came about because some kids were always going to the bathroom and the punishment resulted in several kids peeing their pants in middle school. Why was I not allowed to use the bathroom because some other students abused the privilege? We experience this as teachers too. A whole staff meeting about abusing sick days when really only 2 teachers are doing it. A whole email chain about postings students on social media when it is really one person. It’s frustrating and it isn’t fair.

Try natural and logical consequences for those involved. At a school, I worked at we were trained on Love and Logic. I didn’t like the whole premise but I did like the natural and logical consequences piece. This also ties into Responsive Classroom. The consequence needs to fit the offense. First, determine if a consequence is really necessary. Sometimes procedures need to be retaught and there needs to be a teaching moment, not a consequence. Sometimes consequences are needed. Taking away recess from a student who refused to tie their shoes doesn’t make sense. Having a student clean up all the water they spilled on the ground is a logical consequence. Having them miss PE because of it doesn’t make sense. Make sure the consequence is needed and matches the offense. 

Reflections

What are your biggest classroom management tips?

Where have you shown the most growth in classroom management? (For me, it’s consistency!) 

Share your thoughts and experiences below and let’s grow together! 

Teacher Talk: School Tools TV

Teacher Talk: School Tools TV

Life Without A Guidance Counselor

A few years ago I was teaching and there was no guidance counselor… well there was but she had many many other duties at my school and guidance, it just didn’t happen. I was used to weekly classes taught by the guidance counselor where my students learned about how to get along, how to deal with problems, how to stay healthy, how to study, and so much more. To say I was dying without a guidance counselor would be an understatement. I knew that I had to reach my students with these topics but I just wasn’t trained and didn’t have the language and knowledge to do so. My talks were falling flat and I didn’t know how to become a more effective makeshift guidance counselor. Then I remembered a resource another teacher shared with me the year before- School Tools TV. This is in no way a sponsored post. I just love School Tools TV and wanted to share it will all of my lovely followers. 

Ok, So What is It?

School Tools TV is a website run by a man, who I swear is a genius, named Rusty. I believe Rusty is a former guidance counselor and is our virtual guidance counselor. He has a subscription website with quick little videos teaching social-emotional skills. He is the virtual guidance counselor we all need. Rusty is a real cool guy and the kids buy into him right away. He connects with them and speaks their language. Rusty has become another member of our classroom.  

There are three levels of subscription. My school pays for level 1 for me- it costs $75 per teacher and it wasn’t that hard of a sell to my administrator. I did work at a school where everyone used it and it was pretty cool. With my level 1 subscription, I get access to daily videos. These videos are so cool! Since using Rusty’s videos I’ve seen a decrease in conflict in the classroom and an increase in effective communication skills. Since I currently teach grade 1 I watch the K-2 videos but I started out watching the 3- 7 videos and they are just as great. 

How it Works in My Classroom

I decided to incorporate Rusty’s videos into my morning meeting. We start with a greeting, then we watch Rusty and for share, we discuss the prompt that Rusty has given us. Then we complete a class challenge and that’s our morning meeting! 

Here’s how one of his videos goes! It only lasts about a minute but that minute is one of the most valuable ones of my day! 

“Hi and welcome back little diamonds!” Oh yeah… he calls the K-2 kids little diamonds and I just find it so adorable. My kids identify as diamonds. This year they declared that they are not little, just diamonds. Last year one of my students shaved a diamond into his hair for Rusty. I mean that is how much the kids love him!

After greeting the little diamonds he gives a shout out to one of his classes. My classes have died when we’ve gotten a shout out. Once they tried to get me to email it to all teachers so everyone would know. One year I had to play it during an assembly so the whole elementary could know about Rusty and our shout out. 

After the shout out Rusty shares the feeling word of the week. We made the feeling word part of our calendar and it is listed there along with a picture of the feeling. This has not only helped kids identify their feelings but it helped them as readers identifying character feelings.

Then Rusty gets down to business teaching a new skill. He might teach about not giving up when you’re frustrated, or why we walk in the halls at school, or how to notice when a friend is feeling sad. Then he gives a small piece of advice that kids can try out that day and he asks a question to push their thinking further. 

His videos then end with a poem. A poem that is the first poem we glue into our poetry notebooks and one that my diamonds recite with him each and every morning. 

After the poem, the question pops up on the screen and we move into a circle to share. Sometimes we make a quick anchor chart to remind us of Rusty’s words. Sometimes we set up a little challenge for ourselves based on what was said. We might even try to do something new depending on the topic of the video.  

Try it Out

If you want to try it out or you want more information head on over to School Tools TV to learn more. There is a set of free videos if you want to try it out before diving it. I also just saw that there is a free 30-day trial. 

I know that you’ll enjoy your subscription as much as I have!